Insomnia Articles A-Z

Ambien Side Effects - Generic Silenor

This page contains links to eMedTV Insomnia Articles containing information on subjects from Ambien Side Effects to Generic Silenor. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Ambien Side Effects
    Diarrhea, daytime drowsiness, and dizziness are some of the most common Ambien side effects. This eMedTV Web page also lists rare side effects seen with the drug, as well as confusion.
  • Ambien Sleeping Pill Information
    This eMedTV Web segment takes a look at important information on Ambien, a sleeping pill used for treating insomnia in adults. This page also explains why Ambien may not be suitable for some people and describes possible side effects of the drug.
  • Ambien Tablets
    Ambien is a prescription sleep aid commonly used for treating short-term insomnia in adults. This eMedTV resource explains when and how to take Ambien tablets, describes the specific effects of the drug, and offers general warnings for the product.
  • Ambien Uses
    Ambien uses can help treat insomnia symptoms such as trouble sleeping and waking up often during the night. This eMedTV resource explains how Ambien works and explains that the use of Ambien has not been studied in children yet.
  • Ambien vs. Lunesta
    Many people are unaware of the difference between Ambien and Lunesta. This segment from the eMedTV Web site lists some of the similarities and differences between Ambien vs. Lunesta and describes the specific effects of both medications.
  • Ambien Withdraw
    Stopping Ambien too quickly may lead to withdrawal symptoms, such as vomiting, sweating, and seizures. This eMedTV Web article describes other possible Ambien withdrawal symptoms. Ambien withdraw is a common misspelling of Ambien withdrawal.
  • Ambien Withdrawal Review
    Unpleasant feelings, vomiting, and insomnia can occur when you stop taking Ambien. This page on the eMedTV site contains a list of other possible withdrawal symptoms and explains what to do if you develop symptoms of Ambien withdrawal.
  • Ambien Withdrawl
    If you abruptly stop taking Ambien, withdrawal symptoms may occur. As this Web page from the eMedTV archives explains, some of the possible symptoms include insomnia, nausea, and fatigue. Ambien withdrawl is a common misspelling of Ambien withdrawal.
  • Ambion
    Ambien is often prescribed for the treatment of short-term insomnia. This selection from the eMedTV Web library further discusses this medication, including possible side effects and general dosing guidelines. Ambion is a common misspelling of Ambien.
  • Anbien
    Ambien is a prescription medicine that is licensed to treat short-term insomnia. This part of the eMedTV site explains how Ambien works and offers information on its uses, effects, and potential side effects. Anbien is a common misspelling of Ambien.
  • Benefits of California Poppy
    Treating depression, insomnia, and anxiety are some of the claimed benefits of California poppy. This eMedTV page further discusses these and other California poppy uses, including information on how this herb works and whether it is used in children.
  • Benefits of L-Glutamine
    L-glutamine supplements are claimed to be useful for treating diarrhea, irritability, and other conditions. This eMedTV page lists other possible benefits of L-glutamine, explains how the amino acid works, and discusses L-glutamine use in children.
  • Benefits of Melatonin
    Melatonin may be useful for treating sleep disorders, fibromyalgia, and cancer. This page from the eMedTV library explores other possible benefits of melatonin and explains whether the supplement should be used in children.
  • Benefits of Passion Flower
    Passion flower is claimed to be beneficial for treating anxiety, opiate withdrawal, and other conditions. This eMedTV resource discusses the other potential benefits of passion flower and covers the effectiveness and safety of this product.
  • Benefits of Skullcap
    Skullcap supplements may have anti-anxiety and sedative benefits. This article from the eMedTV archives discusses other possible benefits of skullcap, explores how the supplement may work, and explains whether it should be used in children.
  • Benefits of Tryptophan
    As this eMedTV resource explains, some people may use tryptophan supplements to help with several conditions, such as depression, ADHD, PMS, and anxiety. This page covers other tryptophan benefits and discusses its use in children.
  • Benefits of Valerian
    There are many reasons why people use valerian, but treating insomnia appears to be the most effective use. This eMedTV resource takes a look at other possible benefits of valerian, including information on how it works and whether it is used in children.
  • Best Time to Take Ambien
    Immediately before you go to bed is the best time to take Ambien. As this eMedTV page explains, the drug works quickly, so make sure you are ready for sleep before taking it (do not take it before driving or performing tasks that require concentration).
  • Best Time to Take Lunesta
    You should take your Lunesta dosage immediately before you go to bed. This selection from the eMedTV Web site further discusses the best time for Lunesta to be taken and also provides some tips on safely taking this medication.
  • California Poppy
    California poppy is an herbal supplement that may be used medicinally for depression, anxiety, and insomnia. This eMedTV Web article provides an overview of California poppy, including information on how it may work and potential safety concerns.
  • California Poppy and Breastfeeding
    It may not be safe to use California poppy while breastfeeding. This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains why California poppy and breastfeeding may not be a safe combination, and discusses why natural products are not always safe.
  • California Poppy and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV resource explains that no studies have been done on California poppy and pregnancy, so it is not known if it is safe to take when pregnant. This article also covers why California poppy may not be safe, even though it is a "natural" herb.
  • California Poppy Dosage
    This page from the eMedTV Web site explains that there is no standard California poppy dosage. This page lists the different forms of California poppy and discusses the various ways to take this herbal remedy. This page also offers some dosing tips.
  • California Poppy Drug Interactions
    Alcohol, antidepressants, and narcotics may cause drug interactions with California poppy. This eMedTV segment lists other medicines that may cause California poppy drug interactions and describes the complications that these interactions can cause.
  • California Poppy Overdose
    It is possible to take too much California poppy. This page from the eMedTV site explains that a California poppy overdose may cause difficulty breathing or loss of consciousness. It also discusses the possible treatment options that are available.
  • California Poppy Safety
    California poppy may not be suitable for people who have liver or kidney disease. This part of the eMedTV site takes an in-depth look at California poppy safety concerns, including warnings and precautions to be aware of before taking the supplement.
  • California Poppy Side Effects
    This eMedTV page explains why there is little information available about possible side effects of California poppy. Side effects (based on a study involving additional supplements) may include nausea, muscle stiffness, and morning sluggishness.
  • California Poppy Supplements
    This eMedTV Web segment discusses the herbal supplement California Poppy. Information includes whether it works (and for what), if it is safe, dosing, side effects, and overdose information.
  • Chronic Insomnia
    When a person has trouble sleeping for a month or longer, he or she may have chronic insomnia. This part of the eMedTV library discusses the symptoms, causes, risk factors, and treatment options for this condition, with links to specific information.
  • Cronic Insomnia
    As this selection from the eMedTV archives explains, a person with chronic insomnia has difficulty sleeping for at least three nights a week, for one month or longer. Cronic insomnia is a common misspelling of chronic insomnia.
  • Dalmain
    This page on the eMedTV Web site takes a brief look at the prescription drug Dalmane, noting in particular its uses (focused mainly on insomnia), effects, and general precautions and warnings. Dalmain is a common misspelling of Dalmane.
  • Dalmane
    Dalmane is a prescription drug that has several effects on the body, including causing sleepiness. This eMedTV Web page provides a general overview of the medication, noting in particular its side effects, strengths, and dosing guidelines.
  • Dalmane Abuse
    Some people who take Dalmane may abuse the drug or become dependent on it. This eMedTV article explains that the medication should usually be taken for short periods (one or two weeks or less) to reduce the chances of Dalmane abuse.
  • Dalmane and Alcohol
    This page of the eMedTV library discusses the potential danger of combining alcohol and Dalmane. As this page explains, combining these two drugs can raise your risk of side effects like dizziness, drowsiness, unusual behavior, and memory problems.
  • Dalmane and Breastfeeding
    Dalmane is known to pass through breast milk. This eMedTV page stresses the importance of talking with your healthcare provider about Dalmane and breastfeeding, since each person's situation is different and he or she understands your situation best.
  • Dalmane and Pregnancy
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explains that you should not take Dalmane if you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant. In both human and animal studies involving Dalmane and pregnancy, the drug caused serious problems for the fetus.
  • Dalmane Dosage
    For most people with insomnia, the suggested Dalmane dosage is 30 mg at bedtime. This eMedTV segment also describes dosing for the treatment of elderly people and those with other medical problems, and also provides some tips on taking the drug.
  • Dalmane Drug Information
    This eMedTV resource provides a general overview of the drug Dalmane, which is used to treat insomnia. It includes information on how this medicine works and what to discuss with your healthcare provider prior to beginning treatment.
  • Dalmane Drug Interactions
    Among the drugs that can potentially interact with Dalmane are barbiturates, antidepressants, and alcohol. This eMedTV resource describes how Dalmane drug interactions can raise the risk of side effects like drowsiness, confusion, or memory loss.
  • Dalmane Overdose
    Symptoms of a Dalmane overdose can include confusion, drowsiness, and decreased reflexes. This section of the eMedTV library lists other symptoms of a Dalmane overdose, as well as possible treatment options (like fluids through an IV).
  • Dalmane Side Effects
    Dizziness, drowsiness, and heartburn are among the possible side effects of Dalmane. This eMedTV page also lists some less common side effects seen with this drug (for example, sweating), as well as several serious side effects (like depression).
  • Dalmane Uses
    Dalmane is a benzodiazepine used for treating insomnia. This article on the eMedTV Web site describes how Dalmane works to relieve symptoms of insomnia and also covers off-label Dalmane uses and giving the medication to children.
  • Dalmane Warnings and Precautions
    Some people who take Dalmane may experience life-threatening drowsiness or difficulty breathing. This eMedTV page covers other Dalmane warnings and precautions, such as the safety of taking the drug while nursing and people who shouldn't take it.
  • Diagnosing Insomnia
    This eMedTV page explains how a healthcare provider goes about making an insomnia diagnosis. For example, he or she will usually start by asking several questions about your lifestyle and may ask you to keep a sleep diary as well.
  • Does California Poppy Work?
    California poppy may help treat anxiety, but does California poppy work for other uses? This eMedTV Web article addresses this question and explains why more research is needed to determine the effectiveness of California poppy for any use.
  • Does Melatonin Work?
    Since melatonin is a supplement and not an FDA-approved drug, many people may question its effectiveness. This eMedTV page addresses the question, "Does melatonin work?" and discusses the supplement's effectiveness for various uses.
  • Does Passion Flower Work?
    Many people may question, "Does passion flower work?" This article from the eMedTV Web site explores the safety and effectiveness of passion flower for treating anxiety and opiate withdrawal, and lists other possible passion flower uses.
  • Does Skullcap Work?
    Not many clinical studies have been conducted on the effectiveness of skullcap. This eMedTV article addresses the popular question of, "Does skullcap work?" and explains whether the supplement is effective for any use.
  • Does Tryptophan Work?
    This eMedTV page addresses the question, "Does tryptophan work?" This page explains that early research shows that tryptophan (L-tryptophan) may be effective for some uses, such as treating depression, relieving PMDD symptoms, and smoking cessation.
  • Does Valerian Work?
    Studies have shown that valerian appears to be effective at treating insomnia. This page of the eMedTV library addresses the question, "Does valerian work?" This article also discusses valerian's effectiveness for treating several health conditions.
  • Doral
    Doral is a medication that is prescribed to treat insomnia. This article from the eMedTV library describes the effects of Doral, provides general dosing information for the drug, and explains what you should know before taking the sleep medicine.
  • Doral Abuse
    Doral abuse may potentially occur if the drug is taken in high doses for a long period of time. This eMedTV page lists other risk factors for Doral abuse and explains what withdrawal symptoms may occur if people who are addicted stop taking the drug.
  • Doral and Alcohol
    You should not take Doral and alcohol together because they are both CNS depressants. As this eMedTV resource explains, drinking alcohol while taking Doral can increase your risk of side effects, including dizziness, drowsiness, and memory problems.
  • Doral and Breastfeeding
    Women should avoid using Doral while breastfeeding because the drug passes through breast milk. This eMedTV article further explores the link between Doral and breastfeeding, and explains what side effects may occur in a nursing infant.
  • Doral and Pregnancy
    Doral and pregnancy appears to be a dangerous combination. As this eMedTV page explains, taking the drug early in pregnancy may increase the risk of birth defects and taking it late in pregnancy could cause withdrawal symptoms in a newborn.
  • Doral Dosage
    When treating insomnia, most people start with a daily Doral dosage of 7.5 mg (taken at bedtime). This page of the eMedTV archives contains other Doral dosing information, including precautions and tips for those taking the sleep medication.
  • Doral Drug Information
    Available by prescription only, Doral is a medication used to treat insomnia. This part of the eMedTV Web site provides more information on this drug, including how it works and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before taking it.
  • Doral Drug Interactions
    When seizure medications, barbiturates, or narcotics are taken with Doral, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV segment contains a list of other drugs that may interact with Doral and describes the potential effects of combining these medicines.
  • Doral Overdose
    Confusion, drowsiness, and coma are commonly reported symptoms of a Doral overdose. This article on the eMedTV Web site further describes the potential dangers of a Doral overdose and lists the treatment options that are available.
  • Doral Side Effects
    Common Doral side effects can include dry mouth, headache, and indigestion or heartburn. This eMedTV Web page lists other common side effects of the drug and describes potentially serious problems that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Doral Uses
    Doral is commonly used for treating insomnia in adults. This section of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on what Doral is used for, explains whether the drug is used in children, and lists possible "off-label" Doral uses.
  • Doral Warnings and Precautions
    Since Doral is a controlled substance, it has the potential to be abused. This eMedTV article includes other important Doral warnings and precautions people should be aware of, including information on who should not take the sleep medication.
  • Drug Interactions With Estazolam
    Medicines such as antidepressants or narcotics may potentially cause drug interactions with estazolam. This eMedTV article lists other drugs that may cause negative interactions and describes the complications that these interactions can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With L-Glutamine
    Chemotherapy medications, seizure medicines, and lactulose may cause drug interactions with L-glutamine. This eMedTV page lists specific products that may interact with L-glutamine and describes the potential effects of these L-glutamine interactions.
  • Estazolam
    Estazolam is a prescription drug that is licensed for the short-term treatment of insomnia. This eMedTV page explains the effects of estazolam and offers information on its precautions and warnings, possible side effects, and tips on taking the drug.
  • Estazolam Dosing
    For most people, estazolam dosing usually starts at 1 mg at bedtime. As this eMedTV segment explains, however, your doctor may increase your dose to 2 mg if necessary or may lower the dose for elderly people or those with other health concerns.
  • Estazolam for Insomnia
    As this eMedTV resource explains, estazolam is used for insomnia that occurs on a short-term basis. This segment discusses this topic in more detail, with a link to learn even more about its approved use.
  • Generic Ambien
    As this eMedTV segment explains, generic Ambien is available in 5 mg and 10 mg tablets. This article further explores the generic version, explaining why it should be just as good as the brand-name medicine and listing companies that manufacture it.
  • Generic Ambien CR
    As this eMedTV page explains, you can buy Ambien CR in generic form. This article talks about the generic versions in more detail, with information on who makes them and how they compare to brand-name Ambien CR.
  • Generic Dalmane
    Now that the patent for Dalmane has expired, the medicine is available in generic form. This eMedTV Web page lists the available strengths of generic Dalmane and the companies that manufacture it, and also explains how the FDA rates generic drugs.
  • Generic Halcion
    There are currently two strengths of generic Halcion available. This portion of the eMedTV archives lists these strengths and describes how the FDA has determined that generic Halcion is equivalent to the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Intermezzo
    There are currently no generic Intermezzo (zolpidem sublingual tablet) products available. This eMedTV page discusses when a generic version might become available and explains why zolpidem is a "generic name" for Intermezzo, not a generic version of it.
  • Generic Lunesta
    As you'll see in this selection from the eMedTV site, generic Lunesta (eszopiclone) is now available. This article takes an in-depth look at the generic version, including how it compares to brand-name Lunesta, who makes it, and more.
  • Generic Restoril
    Generic Restoril is currently made by several companies and is available in many different strengths. This eMedTV segment provides an overview of the drug, including information on how the generic version compares to the brand-name version.
  • Generic Rozerem
    Generic Rozerem may become available as early as 2017, when the first patent for Rozerem expires. This eMedTV resource further explains when to expect a generic version of this drug and discusses the dangers of buying unapproved generic medicines.
  • Generic Silenor
    There are no generic Silenor products available at this time. This eMedTV Web page discusses when a generic version of this medication might become available and describes the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
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